Hugh Jackman Urges Sunscreen Use After Skin Cancer Scare

TUESDAY, April 4, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Actor Hugh Jackman is offering a warning about sun damage and skin cancer after having two biopsies.

Jackman was wearing a bandage on his nose in a video posted to his Twitter account.

"I just went to my doctor... and she just saw little things -- could be or could not be basal cell, in her opinion. She doesn't know," Jackman shared. "Summer is coming for those of us here in the Northern Hemisphere. Please wear sunscreen. It's just not worth it no matter how much you want to tan. Trust me, trust me, trust me."

Basal cell carcinoma is common and not as potentially harmful as some other types of skin tumors, such as melanomas. It’s the type of skin cancer that President Joe Biden had removed after a recent physical.

Jackman, 54, urged people to wear sunscreen. He previously was treated for basal cell carcinoma in 2013, 2014 and 2016, CBS News reported.

Jackman reminded viewers that UV exposure in youth can leave a legacy of skin cancer decades later.

"This is all stuff that happened 25 years ago and it is coming out now," he said, pointing to the bandage on his nose. "Put some sunscreen on -- you'll still have an incredible time out there."

About 8 of every 10 skin cancers are basal cell carcinoma, according to the American Cancer Society.

According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), people can protect themselves by wearing a broad-spectrum sunscreen that protects against UVA and UVB rays, preferably with an SPF of 30 or higher every day. Wear it even on cloudy days, the AAD says.

Be sure to cover all of your skin that isn’t already covered by your clothing, including the head, ears, neck and tops of your feet. The AAD recommends using about 1 ounce, the amount that fits into a shot glass, and reapplying every two hours or when swimming or sweating.

Today, you can even get clothing with built-in sun protection. It’s even more protective if it has a UPF (ultraviolet protection factor) label, according to the AAD. Long-sleeved, lightweight shirts, pants, hats and sunglasses with UV protection can all help.

Avoid tanning beds and sun lamps.

If possible, stay out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when the sun’s rays are strongest. Seek shade.

See a dermatologist if you have new or suspicious spots on your skin, including itching or bleeding.

More information

The American Academy of Dermatology has more on basal cell carcinoma.

SOURCES: Hugh Jackman, Twitter; American Academy of Dermatology; CBS News

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